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3D Printed Bike

3D model description

So this is something truly new. From now on everybody can print their own bicycle frame at home.
With some SolidWorks skills you can also make your own customized version for best ergonomic.

Designed by Stephan Schürmann

3D printing settings

We have printed the parts with XT-CF20 on an Ultimaker Original Plus with a 0.8 Nozzle and 100% infill.
Print slow (35mm/s) to get good layer bonding.

You will also need other parts, here's your shopping list:

Frame tubes
bottom bracket
bottom bracket housing
pedals
crankshaft
Wheels
Headset
fork
chain
sprocket
M6 screw + nur for the seat clemp
2k glue (We've used a two component gap filling polyurethane adhesive)
Handlebar (If you don't print it)
These are the tube sizes that you need for this design:
Head tube: D=36 d=34 L=180
Seat tube: D=28.6 d=27 L=651
Top tube: D=31.8 d=30.2 L=527
Down tube: D=35 d=33,4 L=627
Seat stays: D=16 d=14.4 L=581
Chain stays: D=19 d=17.4 L=365

The glue is a really nasty stuff, so we have invented a new glue distribution system. You need a 2k polyurethane glue syringe with a mixing nozzle. After printing the parts you stack them together with all the tubes and push the glue through the inlets between the tubes and the 3D printed parts. The runner system will guide the glue automatically to the right places.

This design has to be seen as a proof of concept, demonstrating that such a project can be achieved with 3D printing.
We have done no amount of testing regarding safety and/or durability.
Therefor we can not take or accept responsibility for anything a user does (prints) with the filament.

  • 3D model format: STL

Creator

Producer of high quality filaments for 3D printing. Creating an ever expanding range of innovative and functional materials.
http://colorfabb.com

License

CC BY


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2 comments

Very Nice ! Good job, great modeling ;)

Wow. Amazing job of building this. How well does it fare terms of durability? Is the handlebar on the photos also 3D printed?