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3D Printing Chamber

3D model description

Angle connectors and magnet holders for a cheap 3D printing chamber frame. Connectors are made for 10x10 mm and 15x15 mm wood bars (length depending on your printer dimensions). Use a cover made of plastic foil and Scotch tape, and use 4 mm neodymium magnets for closing the front flap door.

3D printing settings

Printer Brand:



Prusa Mk2









ABS is recommended rather than PLA to allow better elasticity.
100% infill is highly recommended to prevent angle connectors from breaking.
Before printing you should perform the Part Fitting calibration

How I Designed This

In order to ensure quality 3D prints and minimize the risk of finding a Spaghetti Monster waiting for you in the printer, you should enclose a printer in a chamber that stabilizes the temperature. When printing with ABS, such a chamber is absolutely a must!

Prusa i3 MK2 chamber

Required Parts

ABS angle connectors (printed) - 8 pcs
10 x 10 mm or 15 x 15 mm wood bar (I used 10x10 mm) - length depending on your printer dimensions, generally around 7-8 meters
Transparent plastic foil (2-3 m², do your math for your own printer)
Adhesive tape 2-2.5 cm wide
Optional (for magnet flap door)
ABS magnet holders (printed) - 4 pcs
Neodymium magnets Ø4 mm x 2 mm - 12 pcs
Taking Measures

Measure width, depth and height of your printer. Allow a few centimeters on each side for easier access and to allow the bed to move back and forth. Do not forget to take the spool into account!

Bar dimensions for my Prusa i3 Mk2
Width (sideway bars): 50 cm
Depth: 55 cm
Height (vertical bars): 62 cm
Assembling the Chamber

Carefully cut the bars to the required length and connect them using the 8 angle connectors to make a cubic frame. The bars should fit tightly into connectors. Loose is no good! Use a file or sand paper if the connectors are too tight, or print a single connector for a test, playing with the scale a few percents up or down. Once you find a perfect measure, print the rest of the parts.

Vertical bars should enter inside the holders to have their top side aligned with the top side of the connector.

However, you might want to push the bottom side of the bars a few centimeters pass the bottom side of the connectors, to allow some space for cables. I left 3 cm for "legs" on my Prusa chamber.

Vertical bars enter into holders all the way on the top

The vertical bars go a few centimeters pass the bottom connectors, to allow some space for cables

Allow some space on the bottom for cables

Magnet Flap Door (optional)

If you want to have a front magnet flap door, which is definitely something I'd recommend, do not forget to put the two magnet holders on each side on the front vertical bars, before you assemble the bottom holders.

Force the magnets into the holes using a vice, but first put a bar inside to prevent squishing the connector. Beating a magnet with a hammer is a bad idea, since it will weaken the magnet force. The magnets go into the 4 magnet holders, and 2 go on the front side of the bottom connectors. That's 6 pieces on the frame, plus 6 pieces for the door.

Assembled frame with the front magnet holders (right side of the photo)

Magnet holder

Wrapping Up

Carefully tailor the foil to cover the frame. Allow a few centimeters on each side to wrap around the bars, and fix it with Scotch tape, straining it properly.

Leave the front door connected just on the top side, so it could be flipped on top. Strain in slightly over the magnets and place 6 magnets to hold the door in place.

NOTE ON ADHESIVE TAPE: Use Scotch tape to hold the magnets in place rather than masking tape, because the masking tape won't hold the magnets strong enough, so they will slip out eventually.

Assembled chamber

Secure a magnet on the door flap with a masking, or better a Scotch tape

  • 3D model format: STL





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