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Snapping Hinged Infinity Cube, Magic Cube, Flexible Cube, Folding Cube

3D model description

Snapping Hinged Infinity Cube, Magic Cube, Flexible Cube, Folding Cube

{My students and I so love the infinity cube. I decided to make a hinged one for more flexibility. It is not easy but is fun!}

The magic/flexible/folding/infinity cube (or whatever fancy name you could think of) is easy to build using wooden or cardboard cubes. In my case, I first made a huge model using 48 polydron squares and adhesive tape, just to track the symmetries of the structure. It is an appealing challenge to do it in a 3D design world. In this project, I took advantage of previous work with snapping joints. The result goes beyond my expectations.

It is a bit frustrating to assemble in the beginning, as a puzzle should be. Once you get the symmetry worked out, you won’t be disappointed! Each cube is 36mm x 36mm x36mm.

There are two versions—the regular version with rounded joints and a loose version that allows more room to maneuver. Both versions came out well on my Flashforge Creator Pro. Please try the halves if your printer bed is not big enough.

For my Flexible TPU model, please refer to https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2786094 .

References

https://www.math.nmsu.edu/~breakingaway/Lessons/MFC/MFC.html
https://www.chicaandjo.com/2008/05/08/magic-folding-wooden-photo-cubes/

3D printing settings

Rafts:

No

Supports:

No

Resolution:

.1 to .2mm

Infill:

5-20%

Notes:
The regular version might need a bit of support for smooth rounded joints at the bottom of the print However, it worked well for me without support.

Post-Printing
Be patient. Clean up the prints if necessary. Try to make sense of the symmetry of this thing, using the attached figures. Then, snap the 16 connectors to make a flexible cube -- taking it to infinity!

  • 3D model format: STL

Tags

Creator

STEAM educator, learning from and working with K-12 STEAM teachers to explore new ideas of teaching and engagement. I firmly believe ART is at the core of STEM learning or all human learning! I owe my ideas and designs to the hundreds of K-12 children and teachers and university professors I have had the pleasure of working with, in multiple disciplines-- math, science,engineering language arts, social studies, early childhood education and more! All mistakes, of course, are mine! There is no warranty or liability whatsoever implied or explicit behind the designs or ideas. They are all posted for their potential educational values.

When working with children, please strictly observe all safety and health procedures! Please refer to the NSTA safety guides: http://www.nsta.org/safety/.

LGBU Contact: LGBU@SIU.EDU

License

CC BY


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