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Art Deco Flip Clock (Bioshock)

3D model description

No, I am not going to 3d print entire flippin' mechanism. This is Art Deco bioshock inspired flip clock that use thrift shop purchased sony clock internals.
If you ever dissembled such clock you will know that there is no electronics. It is a purely AC Synchronous motor timed by the 50/60HZ AC frequency and a tons of gears. Actually it is pretty awesome mechanism and one that only improves with time (our 50/60HZ is precise, unlike the AC frequency of yesteryears). If your motor doesn't turn freely it is probably full of dust. Don't put any oil in it, just dip it in alcohol for 10-minutes or hour or so and it will run as new. Look on youtube, lot of people are reviving those things. Or just get one that works right away - like I did. Paid 3.99 for the whole sony clock radio in value village. The clock keeps very precise time.

This is a nice craft project, that require few screws and some glue. It is a 2 color assembly printed on 1 color printer where the different colored inserts snaps together and the stripes are simply glued to places.

The glass is - a flexible magnifier from dollar store. Looks magical. Also see how to orient the pieces on bed. There are few that require support (like the bottom and one of the sides)

To save time I printed the bottom with multiple processes not even printing the underside solid but leaving the honeycomb with only solid printed washers for screws as a second process..

For some items orientation on bed matters (see last pics)
For attaching parts together - I found out the hot glue gun works totally great. Similarly the cable connectors are hot glued inside a "firewall" box.
Two amber LED lights were added inside with some amber foil over them to diffuse the light. There is no transformer for the LEDs inside, just a second cable with a small wall adapter from back.
The clock mechanism was striped of all switches or any parts non essential to the clock itself. The knob for setting time - you will need to re-drill the hole it with 7/64 drill bit (2.7mm) or #36 gauge bit and it is then tight fit. I didn't want to gamble so I made it smaller.

The original design had also white highlights on the opening window, but I decided against them for sharper look.
The white is printed with glow in the dark filament, but then finished in fake copper for final clock to have the bioshock look.

The clock is very precise, it is a great mechanical wonder.

3D printing settings

No supports needed for most part, but the bottom part was printed upside down so there you need support. The bottom is hollowed as much as possible for fast print otherwise it would take too much time and filament. Also I made two process printing in order to not have solid layers in the hollowed part but to have solid layers on the very top rim. Again, just to save time.

See the last pics for the recommended orientation of questionable items.

  • 3D model format: STL

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CC BY


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